I Have Suffered! Can It EVER Be Known?

George Colman the Younger as the theatrical manager at Drury Lane considered Lord Byron a friend and as they got drunk together on more than one occasion. As he had an intuitive understanding of the complexities of the Byron marriage and the subsequent separation - perhaps his poem finally offers us a tantalising hint of what happened all those years ago?

‘Tis a Pity There Were Three of Us!

By April 1816, Lady Byron's desire to be 'securely separated' from her spouse was reaching an increasingly bitter, fraught and heart breaking conclusion...

Bravo! Artful BUT Perfectly Incompatible!

In January 1816 having left her spouse Annabella returned to the protection of her parents who duly offered their support in her resolution for a legal separation. However, Byron was never to learn the reason for her refusal to return to him and despite his letters asking her to state the reasons for leaving him - she NEVER did...

Cheers! I Could Murder a Drink!

By autumn 1815 and as the bailiff beckoned along with the sale of his precious library and several threatened executions - Byron in his worry and torment behaved as many have done before… Yes, he got drunk AND frequently!

My Lady Brigante!

The Lady Brigante loves nothing more than shocking unsuspecting folk with the tale that she was abandoned at birth by gypsies and raised en famille with kindly mice in the crypt of an old church...

Persistence FINALLY Pays!

It was on a chilly November day that persistence finally paid off for the Polite Tourist as she made her way through the throngs of people milling about on Piccadilly and to the relative calm of St James’ Street before finally arriving to meet the man himself at Bennet Street in London's SW1 from whence the above missive was penned some 203 years ago...